Sunday, 3 April 2011

Human to Politician: De-evolution?

It’s been a long while since the last time a politician stood on a podium not giving excuses on the incongruity between the promises and actions of his/her respective government. Basically, they lie; incessantly. But you do have to remember that they’re not like you and I.

We, humans, have moral responsibilities to answer to. Politicians don’t. Their obligations are to their sponsors (who at times, queerly, are themselves).

Politicians are not like all other species; you can’t point your finger and identify a politician at birth – like you do, for instance, a cria (baby llama), or a baby platypus. They’re born human, and eventually mutate into politicians.

Several reasons dictate humans’ deformation into politicians. Some inherit it; others are so adroit at deceit they inadvertently find themselves talking on a podium, telling lies.

In politics, politicians are palatable, and not because it’s their forte but because they find other people who lie as good as or better than themselves. So it’s a big lying orgy.

Lying may appear to be a routine task, but it has pretty intrinsic prerequisites. First of all there’s a meeting where all the best liars in the country congregate. The topic discussed would be the lie which the lie-conveyer – sometime referred to as ‘spokesman’ – will let loose onto the world.

Secondly, the lie is presented to a lying consultancy board. Here, they check whether the lie is predicated on factual grounds; if it is, then it’s scrapped, unless it’s really compelling and subsequently congruent factual grounds are begotten.

Finally, when everything is finalized, the lie-conveyer steps into the blinding wave of flashing cameras to deliver his flagrant lie in a typically somnolent manner.

They say the thing that separates us humans from animal species is our impeccable ability to learn. Not when it comes to politics though. The same politicians tell the same lies perpetually and we insist on analyzing them and their respective outcomes.

Recently, political analysts in the US have been keeping busy with Obama’s address regarding the NATO invasion of Libya. The same thing happened when Obama first assumed office. A wave of “historical” speeches followed, and to no one’s surprise, these speeches were broken down and analyzed.

It doesn’t take a genius to realize that if any politician in any part of the world, at any given time, actually owned up to his promises, there wouldn’t be a need for post-speech/statement analysis. But no, they don’t, hence we have to break the “Da Politician Code” in order to know what to expect.

Politicians seem to have a very bad foreboding ability. Whatever seems to be projected usually ends up being justified for numerous short comings. The world’s inundated with such flawed projections and yet we are incapable of denouncing them.

Recent censuses have shown that the world literacy rate has risen and people are more aware now than they have ever been which implies that the politicians’ attempts to assuage the populace should be predominantly subdued. However, we are still deluged with optimism and expectations every time we listen to our leaders’ empty promises.

These insidious promises are consistent with the leaders’ bids to stay in power or get elected into power. The same lies get told even before the president or prime minister assumes office. This fact alone underscores our inability to see through political gabble.

I’m not attempting to provide a solution for this quandary; I’m just telling it how I see it. It’s extremely exasperating to see the plaudit that heads of states receive despite their habitual deception.

Political promises are a catalyst for nation-wide confusion. Whether quixotic or prudent, policies should be conveyed to the masses on a need to know basis, because otherwise they’re not called policies, they’re called lies.

I am unreservedly convinced that politicians are a grade below normal humans in the evolution spectrum, primarily because they are ascetically devoid.

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